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Wednesday, 10 June 2015

The future of publishing medical journals: 90th Anniversary symposium for the Postgraduate Medical Journal



The Postgraduate Medical Journal was launched in 1925 in the era of the discovery of insulin and penicillin, pioneering examples of development and introduction of life-saving and life-changing medicines during the latter three-quarters of the 20th Century.

A Symposium is being organised on 1st October 2015 in London by the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine to mark the 90th Anniversary of its first official journal, the Postgraduate Medical Journal.

Speakers include Peter Ashman, Publishing Director at BMJ, who will discuss the future for publishing medical journals.  
 
As in the 1920s when the PMJ was launched, medical journals continue to be used by
Peter Ashman
established clinicians to keep up-to-date on clinical practice, by trainees for new learning, and by clinical and other researchers to find out about new and previous research and to describe and disseminate the results of their own research. Key new challenges for publishers, editors, authors and readers include matching the desire for with the need to fund Open Access to what has been published, and how to make the most of opportunities for innovation presented by new electronic media, both in established health care systems and in low resource settings.

Peter Ashman joined BMJ in 2007 and has strategic responsibility for The BMJ, BMJ Careers and BMJ's specialty journal publishing programme, which has grown from 28 journals in 2007 to over 60 titles today. Much of BMJ's growth has come from society publishing contracts and from Open Access journal launches including BMJ Open. Peter sits on BMJ's Executive Committee. Prior to joining BMJ, Peter was Publishing Director at Nature Publishing Group and VP of Publishing at The Lancet in New York. Peter served 6 years on the Board of STM Association and is Chair of the body which represents the interests of scholarly society publishers - the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers alpsp.org


Speakers on the day will comment on what medicine was like in the 1920s, current progress in their field, and what is in prospect over the next 90 years. 

Other speakers will include FPM Fellow Professor Peter Barnes FRS, London, who will speak on evolution of asthma and COPD over 90 years, Professor Dame Carol Black, Principal of Newnham College, Cambridge and Past-President of the Royal College of Physicians who will discuss opportunities to improve public health through a focus on health in the workplace, FPM Fellow cardiac surgeon Wade Dimitri (Coventry) who will discuss early development of heart surgery, vascular surgeon Professor Alison Halliday (Oxford) on carotid surgery to prevent stroke,  Professor Melanie Davies (Leicester) on progress in managing diabetes, FPM Fellow Andrew Marsh, who will discuss new approaches drug discovery, Dr Paul Nunn (London), former Director of the WHO Tuberculosis Programme, on advances in managing tuberculosis, Professor Dudley Pennell (London) on advances in imaging the heart, FPM Fellow Professor Munir Pirmohamed (Liverpool) who will discuss Progress in Personalised Medicine, Dr June Raine (MHRA, London) on vigilance and risk management of medicines, Emeritus Professor Terence Ryan (Oxford) on Sir William OslerProfessor Karol Sikora (London) on cancer - a disease of our time, and Dr David Wilkinson, President of the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists (London) on development of anaesthesia over the past 90 years.

3 comments:

  1. BIOPRINTING: Have to say very clearly to the religious, once and for all, that we are not interested in their religious stories for ignorant, nor their "ethical debates" about anything (they would have to debate whether is it ethical that children perish of hunger in the Third World deliberately maintained, because without poor and ignorant there is not religion, while pontifices living in golden palaces eating partridges, they would have to debate whether is it ethical that all global media are secretly under the tight religious (Inquisition) control to continue "forever and ever" buying-fooling-terrorizing the World on behalf of their sanguinary false gods). We do not want more religion stories nevermore. What we do want with the BIOPRINTING techniques is to get THE IMMORTALITY, period. Future New Humanism (wheat)...religion (darnel).

    ReplyDelete
  2. BIOPRINTING: Have to say very clearly to the religious, once and for all, that we are not interested in their religious stories for ignorant, nor their "ethical debates" about anything (they would have to debate whether is it ethical that children perish of hunger in the Third World deliberately maintained, because without poor and ignorant there is not religion, while pontifices living in golden palaces eating partridges, they would have to debate whether is it ethical that all global media are secretly under the tight religious (Inquisition) control to continue "forever and ever" buying-fooling-terrorizing the World on behalf of their sanguinary false gods). We do not want more religion stories nevermore. What we do want with the BIOPRINTING techniques is to get THE IMMORTALITY, period. Future New Humanism (wheat)...religion (darnel).

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete